Tuesday, May 26, 2015

30 Day Drawing Challenge Day 25- Draw a Teacup

30 Day Drawing Challenge Day 25- Draw a Teacup

This sketch was done initially as a contour drawing with Tombow 947 Water-soluble Marker. Watercolor and permanent black marker also used. 
 Note the color in these shadows!  ©Rebecca Zdybel 

Guess what we are going to draw on Day 25 of our 30 Day Drawing challenge?  

That's right, a teacup.  

I've been asking a lot of you throughout the course of this challenge.  After trying lots of new things, a bit of review might be time well spent. You've earned a day where you get to make some choices in how you will draw.  Today I am only going to suggest the subject matter.  The method you use will be up to you.  


This sketch was done from life with only a Tombow 947 marker.  I had afternoon tea at a lovely Tea Room here in Venice, FL and took the opportunity to record the moment with this sketch.  So fun!  ©Rebecca Zdybel

I like to collect old china teacups, and lately I've been enjoying drawing them as well. We all probably have teacups somewhere in the cupboard, though yours may not look like mine.   Your assignment for today's drawing challenge is to find a teacup and draw it.  I want you to use all your new superpower drawing skills!  They are now becoming more finely honed with each passing day, so I'm giving you freedom to channel them...here's some thoughts:  
  • Think about bringing color into your shadows.  If you use your Tombow marker again today, it will already impart a bit of color if you make it run with a wet brush.  The same would be true of other water-soluble drawing materials. 
  • Consider whether you want to create a contour drawing of your subject or how you wish to approach it. (both of my sketches here began with contour drawings).  
  • Perhaps you'd like to use continuous line contour, begin with a Toned Ground or take a photo and draw it upside-down.  If you're not familiar with these approaches, then you can refer to these previous lessons by following these links: 
  • What drawing tool will you use?  Tombow markers, Elegant writer, Pencil or perhaps some other new favorite drawing tool.  Use this lesson as an excuse to try something you've not yet tried, or to pull out something you know and love.  Whatever you choose will be perfect!
  • Will you simply draw, or will you possibly add watercolor or mix drawing tools together in the sketch?  You decide.

When you finish your sketch, photograph it and send it my way so we can share the fun.  Here are a couple of nice sketches from challengers that have recently come my way: 


Day 24- Tombow Marker Sketch
Day 23- linking shapes with shadows


Enjoy your practice and I'll be back tomorrow with another fun challenge to get a fire lit under your sketchbook... or something like that ;-)


Rebecca Zdybel
Artist, Instructor, Art-Travel Instructor
Art Lessons: Drawing, Watercolor, Acrylic, Collage, Mixed Media
Myrtle Beach, SC
rebecca@artmyrtlebeach.com

Spread Light, Share Love, DO Art!

Feel free to share any of this blog post on your own blog or website, but I ask that you you include:
Rebecca Zdybel is an artist and instructor in Myrtle Beach, SC.  Follow her and see her work at http://www.artmyrtlebeach.com/



Join me on Google+ Rebecca Zdybel Google+ 

Monday, May 25, 2015

30 Day Drawing Challenge Day 24- Tombow Marker Sketch

30 Day Drawing Challenge Day 24- Tombow Marker Sketch
©Rebecca Zdybel 


Today I'm breaking out my Tombow Markers and doing a sketch, and I'm encouraging you to give it a try as well.  If you have another water-soluble marker, then you can substitute it for this one, but my favorite is this Burnt Sienna color  #947.
 If you would like to get one, it's around $5-6. Here is a link to order it:  Tombow 947 Marker- Amazon

One of the things I love about this marker is it's ability to almost disappear once you bring water to the paper.  However, as with most ink applications, don't be too heavy with your lines at first.  Also, this is important...if you plan to use water on your sketch, make sure that your paper is watercolor paper or mixed media paper. 

Here are a few examples of sketches I've done with this marker.  All have been drawn in my favorite sketchbook, my Aquabee Super Deluxe sketchbook.  The paper holds up well for most media, and allows me to bring water to the page without it breaking down.  

I'm not going to tell you what to draw today...keeping it short  and hoping you feel inspired to continue sketching on this 24th Day of our 30 Day challenge.  The subject matter is open, but try using your Tombow pen or a water-soluble marker if you have one.  Otherwise, you could substitute your water-soluble crayons or watercolor pencils if desired.  


Tombow 947 marker, permanent marker and white gouache
©Rebecca Zdybel 

Note: These markers come in all colors, and the sketch below is an example of the many color varieties available. I'm just sharing my favorite with you, but you might experiment and find another color your like better.  Experimenting is the perfect thing to do during a sketch challenge!
©Rebecca Zdybel 
This is a page from my sketchbook.
There are many zentangle patterns recorded here.
All were drawn with various colors of Tombow Markers and Staedtler Mars Black permanent inkpen. 

This challenge is a huge commitment, but you are almost done!  Keep up the good work and send me photos of your finished drawings!  Fellow challengers are drawing their hearts out and are being so dedicated!  Here are some beauties that have been sent my way:



Above: What a lovely sketch of Shadows with Color and Drawing from still life using red and blue Elegant Writer markers on Day 21 of our 30 Day Drawing Challenge. Here's the link in case you missed it: 30 day Drawing Challenge Day 21- Shadows/Color

To the right: Illustrations of Letters give a chance to practice letter making as an art form, and picture making as a means of illustration.  It's fun! If you'd like to try it, here's the link to Day 22:   30 Day Drawing Challenge Day 22- Favorite Letter Illustration

And below:  I had to include this beautiful Zentangle as a reminder of how beautiful pattern making can be.  Obviously influenced by Klimt, this student created something the great master might envy!  In case you missed that lesson, here is the link to Day 20- 30 Day Drawing Challenge- Day 20



Rebecca Zdybel
Artist, Instructor, Art-Travel Instructor
Art Lessons: Drawing, Watercolor, Acrylic, Collage, Mixed Media
Myrtle Beach, SC
rebecca@artmyrtlebeach.com

Spread Light, Share Love, DO Art!

Feel free to share any of this blog post on your own blog or website, but I ask that you you include:
Rebecca Zdybel is an artist and instructor in Myrtle Beach, SC.  Follow her and see her work at http://www.artmyrtlebeach.com/


Join me on Google+ Rebecca Zdybel Google+ 

Sunday, May 24, 2015

30 Day Drawing Challenge Day 23- Linking Shapes with Shadows

30 Day Drawing Challenge Day 23- Linking Shapes with Shadows

Linkage is a design fundamental that describes the process of bringing unity to a piece of art by building connections.  Connections bring harmony and balance and all kinds of good design qualities to your work.  These connections can be made in many ways, but actual physical linking of shapes isn't always possible or may not make sense in your composition.  This is where shadows can play a very convenient role!

Designing better shapes is something we should all be thinking about.  Linking shapes is a really great way to achieve this.  For example, it's often a good idea when possible to take a series of repetitive small shapes and bring them together with connecting shapes.  This can create larger and more interesting shapes, or bring variation to what would otherwise be simple repetition. Again, this is a role that shadows were born to play!

Shadows can be anything from short and stubby to long and lean.  They can go in any direction.   They can GROW if needed to fill gaps.  They can also have color!

(We explored Color and Shadows in Day 21 of our 30 Day drawing challenge- Here's the link in case you missed it: 30 Day Drawing Challenge Day 21: Shadows/Color )

For all these reasons shadows are the perfect means for designing better shapes and creating linkage within your work.


An example of how you can GROW shadows to connect otherwise disconnected shapes ©Rebecca Zdybel 

Today's Challenge: 


Step 1: Draw 3-5 disconnected shapes using a contour drawing and ink.  I love clothespins as a subject, but you can pick anything (toothbrushes, brushes, pencils, crayons...etc.)

Hint: Leave gaps here and there in the contours of your objects to allow for color to visually flow in and out of the shapes and allow for a sense of bounced color from shadow to object. 

Step 2: Use shadows to connect your shapes and form a unified drawing.  Watercolor, watercolor pencils, or watercolor crayons would be a great to use in order to create colored shadows, but colored pencils or markers could also work well. 

Note that my shadows are not realistic, but they serve to connect my shapes together and create linkage.  They also provide a cool complementary color to the warm oranges of the clothespins.  

Step 3: Send a photo of your final result to me:   rebecca@artmyrtlebeach.com

Have fun with this drawing and file the idea away for future compositions when you sketch!  As we learn to draw, these little tricks of the trade can make our work so much better, and they are not that hard.  You just need to spend a little time digesting them. =)

Here are some drawings from the sketchbooks of more fellow Drawing Challengers:  

These all illustrate a very great danger in going down the Zentangle path...IT'S ADDICTIVE and very meditative...and BEAUTIFUL when done like these drawings demonstrate. Wow!  If you missed that lesson, it's available following this link. If you go there beware of the risk of instant addiction! 30 Day Drawing Challenge Day 20- Zentangle




I'm already looking ahead to later this week.  I will be breaking out my Tombow marker in burnt sienna color -947 for a sketch or two during the final couple of weeks of this challenge.  If you would like to get one, it's around $5-6. Here is a link:  Tombow 947 Marker- Amazon

Rebecca Zdybel
Artist, Instructor, Art-Travel Instructor
Art Lessons: Drawing, Watercolor, Acrylic, Collage, Mixed Media
Myrtle Beach, SC
rebecca@artmyrtlebeach.com

Spread Light, Share Love, DO Art!

Feel free to share any of this blog post on your own blog or website, but I ask that you you include:
Rebecca Zdybel is an artist and instructor in Myrtle Beach, SC.  Follow her and see her work at http://www.artmyrtlebeach.com/



Join me on Google+ Rebecca Zdybel Google+ 

Saturday, May 23, 2015

30 Day Drawing Challenge Day 22- Favorite Letter Illustration

30 Day Drawing Challenge Day 22- Favorite Letter Illustration

Injecting content in our drawings can be done in many ways.  Words can add meaning, but illustration has long been a means of telling a story with pictures.   I've been getting asking a lot of you over the last few days, so in order to get right to the drawing I'm going to keep today's instructions simple.

Today's challenge:  Pick your favorite letter and then illustrate it somehow.  You could Zentangle the letter like we did in yesterday's challenge, or practice a new font style, but you have creative license today.  An easy way to do it might be to pick a picture of something that begins with your favorite letter...here's mine:

Z is for Zebra ©Rebecca Zdybel
My sketch is done with permanent archival ink (micron o4 black) and watercolor
Have fun with your illustrations!  When ur done, please share the photo with me.
Keep up the great work...you're almost finished with 30 Days of Drawing!

Here are drawings from a fellow challenger's sketchbooks:



Great perspective and shadow on both of these sketches!  For more on  light and shadow and how to make a cube look 3-D you can check out Day 19 of the 30 Day Drawing Challenge.  Just follow this link: http://www.artmyrtlebeach.com/2015/05/30-day-drawing-challenge-day-19-cube.html 
Beautiful Zentangle butterfly from 30 Day Drawing Challenge Day 20 Zentangle- If you missed this lesson, here is the link: 30 Day Drawing Challenge Day 20- Zentangle 

Definitely Cool! and Cloudy with a Chance of Zentangle ;-)
It's so fun seeing what you guys are coming up with!  Thanks for taking the time to send them my way. =)

I will be using my Tombow marker in burnt sienna color -947 for a sketch or two during the final couple of weeks of this challenge.  If you would like to get one, it's around $5-6. Here is a link to order:  Tombow 947 Marker- Amazon

Rebecca Zdybel
Artist, Instructor, Art-Travel Instructor
Art Lessons: Drawing, Watercolor, Acrylic, Collage, Mixed Media
Myrtle Beach, SC
rebecca@artmyrtlebeach.com

Spread Light, Share Love, DO Art!

Feel free to share any of this blog post on your own blog or website, but I ask that you you include:
Rebecca Zdybel is an artist and instructor in Myrtle Beach, SC.  Follow her and see her work at http://www.artmyrtlebeach.com/



Join me on Google+ Rebecca Zdybel Google+ 

Friday, May 22, 2015

30 Day Drawing Challenge Day 21- Shadows/Color

30 Day Drawing Challenge Day 21- Shadows/Color


A couple of days ago we explored the values and form of shadows by drawing a 3-D cube.  Value or light and shadow is definitely the key to making a cube look 3-D.  However, for me the beauty of imagery is often found in the exploration of color!  I love color!



Shadows have COLOR.  We may think of them as gray, but as artists, we need to see what others may not see and appreciate the fact that color lives in those shadows!  This is a phenomenon that is attributable to bouncing light.  As light hits, it bounces and carries with it the inherent color of the object reflecting the light into the shadow.  This means that there is an exchange of color between surrounding objects which can be found in the shadows.  Check out these photos as examples:


Do you see the green color being bounced into the form shadow of the pear? The green of the surface turns this red pomegranate almost black as the colors mix to form a neutral dark (red+green=black or gray). 

Do you see that this house has different color shadows in relation to the surrounding surfaces?  The reverse would be true if the surface was white and the house had color.  

Today's Challenge:  

Materials: 
Pen (permanent marker) +watercolor, pencil+water-soluble markers, or colored pencils could all work for this exercise.  
Paper
Objects to draw

I experimented with the Brown Elegant Writer marker and watercolor here.  I asked myself, "What if?" and this is what happened.  Note the warm shadows under the radishes (yes, that's what they are! lol) and the warm bounced red into the blue glass bottle. This is an example of how color can be found in shadows and exchanged between objects.  No dull gray shadows here...instead lots of vibrant color!
Step 1: Do a contour drawing of an object(s) from life with a pen.  No photos today, practice drawing something in front of you.  Make it a contour drawing, but with this special instruction:  leave some gaps in the contour.  Don't enclose the outside entirely with lines.  As you explore some of the edges and follow them in from the outside edge, don't worry about sealing that edge up with a line.  Let it breathe here and there!  Open edges will be helpful in creating some color exchange between our objects and their shadows.

Step 2: Bring color to your drawing and think about showing the following:  
  • color exchange taking place between objects and their shadows
  • color exchange taking place between objects via bounced light
  • bounced light effects from the surface back onto the form of your objects

Have fun with this drawing and use it as an opportunity for incidental color...colors which may or may not be there, but which you take the liberty of injecting.  You're the artist, so add your personal touch!

Congratulations on being more than ⅔ of the way to the finish line  in our 30 Day Drawing Challenge!  Those of you who have been participating can look forward to a real sense of accomplishment and progress at the end of your 30 days.  I'm so excited for you!  

Examples of drawings of cubes from our previous challenge on Day 18 of the 30 Day Drawing Challenge
In case you want to learn this process here is a link http://www.artmyrtlebeach.com/2015/05/30-day-drawing-challenge-day-18-draw.html



This great sketch of an owl uses Zentangle as a patterning technique.  The sketch below is another example of how patterns can make for interesting drawings.  For more on this method see the instructions for Day 20 of the 30 Day Drawing Challenge- http://www.artmyrtlebeach.com/2015/05/30-day-drawing-challenge-day-21_21.html



I'm looking ahead to later this week.  I will be breaking out my Tombow marker in burnt sienna color -947 for a sketch or two during the final couple of weeks of this challenge.  If you would like to get one, it's around $5-6. Here is a link:  Tombow 947 Marker- Amazon

Rebecca Zdybel
Artist, Instructor, Art-Travel Instructor
Art Lessons: Drawing, Watercolor, Acrylic, Collage, Mixed Media
Myrtle Beach, SC
rebecca@artmyrtlebeach.com

Spread Light, Share Love, DO Art!

Feel free to share any of this blog post on your own blog or website, but I ask that you you include:
Rebecca Zdybel is an artist and instructor in Myrtle Beach, SC.  Follow her and see her work at http://www.artmyrtlebeach.com/



Join me on Google+ Rebecca Zdybel Google+ 





Thursday, May 21, 2015

30 Day Drawing Challenge Day 20: Zentangle Doodling




30 Day Drawing Challenge Day 20:  Zentangle Doodling

Tangled Turtle © Rebecca Zdybel and page from my sketchbook
Tombow markers and black permanent Staedtler Mars Pen.
You can use this drawing as a reference for pattern possibilities =)

Zentangle is kind of a fad these days.  It's a trademarked method which is essentially doodling with an organized pattern.  It's fun, and I like the intent, which is to show that drawing can be for everyone.  If you know me, you know that I'm passionate about the idea that art is teachable and enriching for anyone willing to spend the time.  So, I love zentangle and think it's worth trying.  There are so many different ways to draw, that I'd like to introduce you to as many as I can during our 30 Day Drawing Challenge.

Taking patterns and using them to fill in shapes is not new.  It's a method many famous artists have used with great result...Gustav Klimt and Picasso come immediately to mind.  Check out these examples of patterns being used within shapes for visual interest.  Patterns that are used repeatedly can be referred to as "motifs".  Repetition can provide harmony in design, and that's a good thing.
Claude son of Picasso- Picasso

Dora Maar in an Armchair- Picasso
Girl Before a Mirror- Picasso
The Kiss- Gustav Klimt
So with this in mind, we are going to make some patterns using dots, squiggles, circles, squares...any little thing you'd like to use to fill in your drawing.  It's going to be fun!

Materials for this lesson: 
any drawing tool you'd like to use
paper

Step 1: Draw a contour drawing of a silhouette shape...it can be anything but here are some ideas. 

Tangled Turtle-©Rebecca Zdybel




Step 2:   Draw a string or multiple string lines within your big shapes...a loopy loop, a squiggle, a "z" (my favorite! ;-).  It's basically a way to break up the big shape into a few odd shapes.  

Step 3: Begin to Tangle within the shapes created by your "string" lines.  

The following is excerpted from wikihow: 

Start creating a tangle. A "tangle" is a pattern drawn in pen along the contours of a string. One Zentangle may have just one tangle, or a combination of different tangles. Use your pen to begin drawing whatever pattern comes to you - again, there's no right or wrong move inside a Zentangle. As you work, keep the following in mind:
  • Tangles should be composed of very simple shapes. A line, a dot, a circle, a squiggle, or an oval are all acceptable.
  • Penciled shading can be added to the tangles to create more depth and visual interest. This is not mandatory, but you're free to do so if you'd like.
Step 4: Continue to fill in your patterns within each section, changing them as you come to a new section.  Have fun with this, there is no wrong way to do it.  

Step 5: You can shade the patterns, or add color as you wish.  

Step 6:  Send me a photo so we can all enjoy your efforts!
Deb Thoden's beautiful example of zentangle. 

Here is another challenger's drawing sent to me yesterday...
Lovely! The Elegant writer has yet another fan in this artist...

Happy Zentangling!  I hope you enjoy it and find your zen...
(if you want more detailed zentangle instructions, here's a website http://www.wikihow.com/Make-a-Zentangle)

 I will be breaking out my Tombow marker in burnt sienna color -947 for a sketch or two during the final couple of weeks of this challenge.  If you would like to get one, it's around $5-6. Here is a link:  Tombow 947 Marker- Amazon

Rebecca Zdybel
Artist, Instructor, Art-Travel Instructor
Art Lessons: Drawing, Watercolor, Acrylic, Collage, Mixed Media
Myrtle Beach, SC
rebecca@artmyrtlebeach.com

Spread Light, Share Love, DO Art!

Feel free to share any of this blog post on your own blog or website, but I ask that you you include:
Rebecca Zdybel is an artist and instructor in Myrtle Beach, SC.  Follow her and see her work at http://www.artmyrtlebeach.com/



Join me on Google+ Rebecca Zdybel Google+ 

Tuesday, May 19, 2015

30 Day Drawing Challenge Day 19- Cube with Shadows/Value

30 Day Drawing Challenge Day 19- Shadows

How did you do with your perspective drawing of a cube yesterday?  I hope it felt as if you were enlightened with a simple way to digest 2-point perspective.  Today we will build on that concept a bit, and bring life to our cubes with shadows.  

In today's free drawing lesson, I will challenge you to think about shadows.  Shadows are definitely what brings a line drawing to life.  They add dimension and form.  They give a sense of light, and depth.  They bring mood to our subject matter.  It's important to understand them, and once you do, you'll find it will help you with all kinds of artwork.  Whether you draw or paint, these concepts are really important!

There are some simple ideas surrounding shadow, which we should all know about.  First of all, there are two kinds of shadows: 
  • Form shadows are found on the surface of objects in areas where the object turns away from the light source. 
  • Cast Shadows- are shadows created when an object blocks the light from hitting an adjacent surface.  Every object that blocks light has a cast shadow associated with it.  
Cast shadows are always opposite the source of light.  So, they change.  As the source of light changes, so does it's cast shadow.  The closer to the horizon the light source is, the longer the shadow.  

Cast Shadows also vary in intensity or darkness.  As artists, we could also say that they vary in VALUE.

The general rule of thumb is: shadows are darkest in value closer to the object casting the shadow.  

If the object is a reflective object, then things change, but for most objects, you can assume that the shadow will be darkest closer to whatever is casting the shadow.  

Form shadows are found on the surface of objects and are determined by the shape of the object which is turning away from the light.  Generally, the more steeply the object turns away from light, the quicker the value shift or change in value will be.  
(For more on how to draw a rounded shape you can follow this link - Link to 30 Day Drawing Challenge Day 11- Drawing Rounded Forms.) 

To show an Angled corner, create a dramatic value shift, and this will tell us that a drastic change in direction of the surface has occurred. 

Today we will build on the knowledge gained yesterday in learning how to draw a cube. We will add shadows to make our cube look 3-D.  
(In Case you missed yesterday's challenge, here is a link: 30 Day Drawing Challenge Day 18- How to Draw a Cube)


Note:


  • The darkest cast shadows are found closest to the object and where there is the least amount of bounced light.  
  • The shadows become lighter as they move away from the object. 
  • Drastic changes of value tell us that a dramatic change in direction of the surface has occurred. 

Today's Challenge How to Draw a Cube with Shadows 
(Make it Look 3-D)
Materials:
Graphite pencil
Eraser
Paper

Step 1: Draw a Cube in Perspective. You could draw a box from life, or you could make one up.  Your cube can be solid as in the first reference photo above, or it can be an open box as in my drawing above. (In Case you missed yesterday's challenge, here is a link: 30 Day Drawing Challenge Day 18- How to Draw a Cube)

Step 2: Determine your light source and add light and add form shadows to the surfaces of your cube.  The lightest areas will be those getting hit by sun at a 90 degree angle.  Less Direct light will be slightly darker.  Those surfaces away from the light entirely will be darkest. (You may need to adjust your values as you go along, because all values are relative to one another.  Your pencil may not be able to get as dark as what you see.)

Step 3: Now draw the CAST SHADOWS. Remember that the shadow will get lighter as it moves away from the object casting the shadow.  

A Couple of hints for you: 

  •  Pay attention to the edge quality of the shadow.  Sometimes shadows are hard or crisp edged (usually in areas of dramatic shadow), and other times they are softer(as the shadow fades, sometimes the edges will get softer or more "smudged" in appearance).  
  • Sometimes it's helpful to leave a little gap of light between the base of object and the deepest part of the cast shadow.  

I hope this challenge allows you to work through the problem of creating a sense of light and shadow.  Adjusting values can be necessary...making sure that the areas receiving less light are darker than those getting more light, and accounting for "bounced light" can be tricky.  Practice is always a good thing, so have fun and send me photos of your finished work so we can share.  


I'm already looking ahead to later this week.  I will be breaking out my Tombow marker in burnt sienna color -947 for a sketch or two during the final couple of weeks of this challenge.  If you would like to get one, it's around $5-6. Here is a link:  Tombow 947 Marker- Amazon

Here are a few of the dedicated 30 Day Drawing Challengers who are steadfastly chipping away at this challenge.  I'm so proud and happy that you are doing this with me!  I know you'll be so glad you did it...maybe you already are ;-)
Day 16- Draw Your Drink
Don't you love the drippy letters?!

Day 17- Vignette background

Day 17- Vignette
Nice use of water and spatters to create an obscure background vignette!
Watercolor in combination with the Elegant writer.

Rebecca Zdybel
Artist, Instructor, Art-Travel Instructor
Art Lessons: Drawing, Watercolor, Acrylic, Collage, Mixed Media
Myrtle Beach, SC
rebecca@artmyrtlebeach.com

Spread Light, Share Love, DO Art!

Feel free to share any of this blog post on your own blog or website, but I ask that you you include:
Rebecca Zdybel is an artist and instructor in Myrtle Beach, SC.  Follow her and see her work at http://www.artmyrtlebeach.com/



Join me on Google+ Rebecca Zdybel Google+ 

Monday, May 18, 2015

30 Day Drawing Challenge Day 18- Draw a Cube

30 Day Drawing Challenge Day 18- How to Draw a Cube

We've been having such fun with drawing contours and vignettes, but this drawing challenge would be incomplete without touching on a subject that involves perspective...the dreaded "P" word!  It's something which most non-artists don't understand.  I've also found that many of my adult students of art have skipped right over this subject on their way to painting pretty pictures.  It's possible to paint or draw without knowing perspective, but it's a fundamental of drawing which will undermine your work if you don't understand it.

The best way I know to sum up perspective is with these 3 points:

  • Every realistic image you draw or paint has a horizon- and that horizon is always at the viewer's eye level.  Hmmm, let's think about that.  So what I'm saying is that the horizon will always be located at the level of the eye of the viewer. Plain and simple.  Not hard, right?
  • Due to the earth curving away from us, parallel straight lines will seem to recede to one point as they move away from us. That point is called the "disappearing point".  That disappearing point is ALWAYS SOMEWHERE ON THE HORIZON LINE.  Ok..that isn't too hard either, right?
  • Parallel lines will always recede to the same point.  So this means that any line which is running in the same direction as other lines will recede to the same point. 

3 points, but none of them are too tough, right?  

Ok, then let's draw a box.  It's not easy, but it illustrates this concept.  Don't stress...just follow the steps and use my drawings as reference.  Trust me!  If you've never done this before, it's information worth knowing. 



Step 1:  Draw the closest corner of the box with a vertical line.   This is always how I would recommend beginning to draw a cube. This line representing the closest corner is going to be referred to as Line A.  
Step 1 and 2
Step 2: Draw a horizon line going across the page.  Make a mark somewhere to the left of the paper and another mark toward the right edge of the paper.  These will be your disappearing points.
Step 3

Step 3: As in the drawing above, draw a light line from the top and bottom of the line in Step 1 to each disappearing point.  This will form 2 triangles.  These lines will serve as guidelines for forming your box.  Eventually we will erase portions of them.  
Step 4

Step 4: Using the guidelines, and my drawing above as an example.  Draw two vertical lines- 1 left of Line A and 1 right of Line A.  Keep them within the guidelines.  These lines will form the right edge and back left edge of your box. 

Step 5:  From the bottom of the back left edge line, draw a line  connecting it to the same disappearing point as the bottom of the front of the box.  They both recede to the same disappearing point because they are parallel.  

step 5 and 6
Step 6:  From the Top of the Right edge draw a line to the disappearing point on the left.  It recedes to the same point as those lines from the left side of the box, because why?  Because they are parallel, or running in the same direction.

Step 7: One more line to create, and it's a bit tricky, but just look at the photo if it's confusing.  Connect the bottom of the right side to the left disappearing point.  This is creates your final line of recession and should form an "x" under the "x" above it.  Connect between the two "x's" with a line to form the back right corner of the box.  Here's another photo with arrows pointing to the "x's"...
Step 7 again
Step 8: Draw a line connecting the two "x's".  This will form the back right corner as in the photo below. 
Step 8- A Cube in 2 point perspective


There you go!  You've drawn a cube in 2 point perspective.  This shape forms the basis of most architectural drawing and can be helpful drawing many other forms as well.  

Step 9: To reinforce your understanding of drawing the cube, I would suggest you draw it again.  Refer to my directions ONLY if you forget what to do.  Try to draw the cube until you feel like you own the concept.  
Once finished, take it easy and let the understanding sink in for today.  If you've drawn it 2 or 3 times, then you've done enough. 

Congratulations!  You have learned a VERY important concept about perspective!  You are officially a little bit smarter now.  Enjoy the rest of your day and I'll meet you here tomorrow...

PS- If you haven't sent me any photos of your drawings lately...be sure to send them my way so I can include them in future posts...anonymously of course.  Be sure to tell me what lesson you are illustrating and what tools you used in your sketch.  Can't wait to see what you've done!

I'm already looking ahead to later this week.  I will be breaking out my Tombow marker in burnt sienna color -947 for a sketch or two during the final couple of weeks of this challenge.  If you would like to get one, it's around $5-6. Here is a link:  Tombow 947 Marker- Amazon

Happy Drawing!!

Rebecca Zdybel
Artist, Instructor, Art-Travel Instructor
Art Lessons in all media
Myrtle Beach, SC
rebecca@artmyrtlebeach.com

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Rebecca Zdybel is an artist and instructor in Myrtle Beach, SC.  Follow her and see her work at http://www.artmyrtlebeach.com/



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